FEATURE | Maritime manoeuvring in Asia

Recent developments have underscored the complexity of the maritime defence diplomacy manoeuvres now taking place in Asia’s seaways. The current situation is a product of the rivalry between Beijing and Washington, China’s determination to “recover” the “renegade province” of Taiwan, and the strengthening of ties between the USA and the Taiwanese.

FEATURE | Freedom-of-navigation operations aren’t all about the South China Sea

The recent close encounter between USS Decatur and the Chinese Luyang II–class guided-missile destroyer Lanzhou (pictured) has attracted much attention in the media. There’s little doubt that the Chinese ship created a dangerous situation in breach of the Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, which requires a vessel that’s overtaking another to keep out of its way until "finally past and clear".

Philippine Navy flagship aground in disputed waters

The Philippine Navy (PN) suffered major embarrassment on August 29 when the service’s flagship, the frigate Gregorio del Pilar grounded on Half Moon Shoal (Hasa Hasa), on the eastern edge of the disputed Spratly Archipelago, in the South China Sea.

OPINION: China’s cable strategy – exploring global undersea dominance

Since September 2016, China Telecom has replaced satellite stations on Fiery Cross Reef, Subi Reef and Mischief Reef in the Spratly Islands with 4G fibre-optic cable stations. Fibre-optic cables are much faster and much more stable than satellite systems. Installation began just two months after an arbitral tribunal in the Hague unanimously found against Chinese territorial claims in the South China Sea. The stations significantly strengthen China’s command and control capabilities in the South China Sea. Over the longer term, China’s cable strategy holds serious security implications for the US, Taiwan and the Asia–Pacific community.

Subscribe to this RSS feed

Subscribe to the Ausmarine mailing list

* indicates required