Welcome to Marine Engines & Propulsion Systems (MEPS) Week

MEPS WEEK

So much happens, seemingly on a monthly basis, in the global marine engine and propulsion system market that it is difficult to remember it all.

Currently, there seems to be an inexorable rise in the numbers of types and sizes of diesel outboard motors. Despite their distinct weight and price disadvantages when compared with petrol outboard motors, they are creating a definite and growing niche for themselves.

Obviously, for commercial and military users, their much lower fuel consumption, greater torque and distinctly better fire safety outweigh their disadvantages. Hopefully, as more of them are manufactured, their prices will reduce. Weight may be another matter but, given the advances made on that score with other engines, improvements should be possible.

In other sectors, water jets are being constantly refined to achieve better performance and greater reliability. There’s very little wrong with them these days. Much the same applies to azimuthing thrusters, surface drives and the like.

Engines • Gensets • Gearboxes • Outboards • FPP • CPP • Waterjets • Sterndrives • Hybrid/Electric • Thrusters • Renewables • Nuclear • Gas Turbines

Diesel continues to be by far the dominant fuel but we are increasingly seeing electric and hybrid propulsion systems and, particularly with larger, short voyage vessels, LNG is gaining inroads. There is even talk, and some experimentation, with hydrogen power. Fuel storage with the latter two fuels remains a complication but one that should be eliminated before long.

Electric power is fine for shorter voyages in places where clean electricity is readily available such as Norway, Sweden, Britain, Tasmania and France. However, where electricity is generated in coal-fired power stations, its use seems to be pointless. In fact it is uselessly expensive. Meanwhile, batteries remain expensive, heavy, rapidly depleted and still subject to fire risk.

There is, of course, much more development underway globally. Great advances in both engines and propulsion systems are on their way. All are becoming more efficient, more economical and more reliable as well as user-friendly.

Baird Maritime presents you with news of marine engine and propulsion developments on an almost daily basis. Watch carefully over the next week for an even better than usual coverage.


Vessel Reviews:


Features and Opinion:

COLUMN | In praise of a fixed mindset [Tug Times]

– “Essentially, Ume Maru is a small, circular hull with a single azimuthing thruster and what appear to be suckers on what appears to be the bow. The idea is to place the vessel against the hull of a seagoing ship, where it sucks itself securely alongside and can provide thrust in any direction. It also has a couple of towing hooks for pulling.”

– by Alan Loynd, former General Manager of the renowned Hong Kong Salvage and Towage company

New Norwegian ferry breaks all-electric distance and speed records

– “No electric passenger boat goes so far and so fast, and in addition there is a climate measure with 270,000 litres of diesel saved a year”


News and Gear:


Remember to come back every day to see the latest news, opinion and vessel reviews!

Call for content!

Any news or views about the global engines and propulsion systems sectors? Send it through to editor@baird.com.au ASAP (between now and June 12), so we can add it to this current edition of MEPS Week!

We are after:

  • Vessels – Orders, new deliveries, under construction
  • Gear – Latest innovations and technology in the engines and propulsion systems sector
  • Reminiscences – Do you have any exciting, amusing or downright dangerous anecdotes from your time in the maritime world? (example here)
  • Other – Any other relevant news

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Neil Baird

Co-founder and former Editor-in-Chief of Baird Maritime and Work Boat World magazine, Neil has travelled the length and breadth of this planet in over 40 years in the business. He knows the global work boat industry better than anyone.