COLUMN | Bourbon and its management in the dock after suitcase of cash is found at Marseille airport [Offshore Accounts]

Losing your baggage after a long-haul flight is annoying and frustrating. Losing your suitcase when it contains over US$250,000 in hundred-dollar bills inside must be even more vexing. For Marc Cherqui, the former tax director of Bourbon, the French operator of over two hundred offshore support vessels, the recovery of his lost bag when he returned home to France from a business trip in Nigeria in October 2012 was only the beginning of his problems. The suitcase stuffed with cash was eventually re-united with its grateful owner at Marseille Airport.

COLUMN | Staying mum on pirate problems [Grey Power]

I never sailed in the West African trades, but I know several people who looked back with the fondest memories of voyages to that part of the world, with ships being worked in roadsteads; cargo loaded and discharged using surfboats and the seamanship exhibited by the cheerful locals who handled these boats.

  • Published in Piracy

EDITORIAL | 2018: A bad year for ferry fatalities

After a couple of good years in 2016 and 2017, 2018 saw a significant increase in ferry fatalities worldwide. From 549 “known” fatalities in 2016, the total increased to 748 in 2017 and then jumped dramatically to 1,082 in 2018.

  • Published in Ferries

Gulf of Guinea piracy – regional navies step up to the plate

The International Maritime Bureau’s (IMB) Annual Report on Piracy and Armed Robbery Against Ships for 2018 showed an overall rise in worldwide piratical attacks upon shipping, with 201 recorded attacks, up from 180 in 2017. An area of particular concern is the Gulf of Guinea (GoG), which saw some 73 attacks, with Nigerian waters accounting for 48 of these.

  • Published in Piracy

FEATURE | Renewed Mediterranean migration crisis threatens

Since 2014, more than 1.5 million irregular migrants (IM) have crossed the Mediterranean to Europe from North Africa, by means of small boats, thereby earning migration racketeers a great deal of money. Around 18,000 IMs have probably died making the trip, mainly due to the foundering of the fragile and overcrowded vessels used.

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